"They did a good job, they painted our family room. Kitchen. 1/2 bathroom and a hallway. We chose Edge comb gray to cover our previous gold walls. I was disappointed that they missed areas around our blinds that we didn't notice during our walkthrough. I phoned the project manager and they send a painter the next day to touch up the areas missed. We also noticed they didn't remove the blinds to paint over the previous gold paint and it was visible. I asked the painter to remove the blinds to paint under them, but the next day one of our blinds fell down when opening them and I couldn't get it back up. I called the project manager and he said the painters are not suppose to remove blinds for this very reason. I think that's really poor of Precision to paint around the blinds and that will impact my decision for painting the rest of my house since my previous painter removed them and I don't want old colors left behind around the windows. Other than that, we are happy with the paint job"
Generally speaking, a gallon of paint will cover about 350 square feet. If this is the first time drywall is painted, it will soak up more paint. And remember to factor in whether your job will require one or two coats of paint. Dark and bright colors will require more coats of paint, as will painting a lighter color over an existing darker color. Divide the paintable wall surface by 350 to determine how many gallons of paint you will need to buy. If there’s an odd number with less than .5 leftover, round down, if it’s over .5 round up.
Custom Colonial Painting is a Connecticut house painting contractor serving homeowners statewide. We have over two decades and thousands of homes worth of experience. Our professional exterior painters and interior painters each average at least 15 years of hands-on experience. Having painted everything from Connecticut’s many residential capes, ranches, and condos, to commercial buildings throughout the state, we take the same pride in painting your home as we would our own.
A thorough scrubbing is a must before painting any exterior surface. It removes the dirt and broken-down paint residues that keep fresh coats from adhering and gets rid of mildew that grows on paint in all but the most arid climates. Most contractors clean with pressure washers, but in the hands of someone unfamiliar with the equipment, these can gouge wood, shatter glass, and drive water behind siding and trim. Using a hose, a pump sprayer, and a scrub brush is slower but safer, and just as effective.
When the primer is dry, caulk all small joints (less than ¼-inch-wide) in the siding and trim. Most pros use siliconized acrylics—paint won't stick to straight silicones—but Guertin and O'Neil like the new, more expensive urethane acrylics for their greater flexibility and longevity. O'Neil stresses that it's shortsighted to skimp on caulk. "If the joint fails, you're back to square one." Guertin uses the lifetime rating as his quality guide. "I don't expect 35-year caulk will last 35 years, but it should last longer than a 15-year caulk."
Location: Stamford, CT Date: 01/06/2021 What is the approximate living square footage of your home?: 1500-3000 sqft What is the primary exterior surface material of your home?: Wood How many stories is your home?: Two stories What size is your attached garage?: 2-Car Garage Request Stage: Planning & Budgeting Desired Completion Date: Timing is flexible
Before you start a painting job either on the interior your home, or the exterior, you’ll need to estimate how much paint to buy. There are various factors to take into consideration when deciding how many gallons of paint to buy for your project. You’ll need the square footage of the area that needs to be painted, while keeping in mind that doors and windows require a different type of paint from the walls.
A thorough scrubbing is a must before painting any exterior surface. It removes the dirt and broken-down paint residues that keep fresh coats from adhering and gets rid of mildew that grows on paint in all but the most arid climates. Most contractors clean with pressure washers, but in the hands of someone unfamiliar with the equipment, these can gouge wood, shatter glass, and drive water behind siding and trim. Using a hose, a pump sprayer, and a scrub brush is slower but safer, and just as effective.
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